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Transformers Toy Review Archive (older series, 1984 to date)

G1 Transformers trademarks and their current status with Hasbro

Written by Nevermore
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Introduction: Name reuses within the various Transformers toylines

Index by years

Alphabetical index

Part 1: Overview - copyrights, patents and trademarks

Part 2: Names Hasbro never lost (1)

Part 3: Names Hasbro never lost (2)

Part 4: Names Hasbro managed to get back (1)

Part 5: Names Hasbro managed to get back (2)

Part 6: Names Hasbro had to modify

Part 7: Names Hasbro had to find a substitute for

Part 8: Names of characters which were originally not released as toys

Part 4: Names Hasbro managed to get back with ease because no-one had tried to take them away in the meantime

[ Mirage | Ironhide | Thundercracker | Skywarp | Wheeljack | Sunstreaker | Cliffjumper | Windcharger | Huffer | Laserbeak | Buzzsaw | Jetfire | Inferno | Red Alert | Smokescreen | Hoist | Perceptor | Sludge | Beachcomber | Seaspray | Bonecrusher | Scavenger | Long Haul | Astrotrain | Ramjet | Thrust | Dirge | Downshift | Kickback | Ransack | Air Raid | Skydive | Fireflight | Streetwise | Hot Spot | First Aid | Dead End | Swindle | Bruticus | Springer | Blurr | Cyclonus | Scourge | Broadside | Razorclaw | Rampage | Divebomb | Trypticon | Swerve | Runamuck | Fortress Maximus | Scorponok | Weirdwolf | Sixshot | Rollbar | Wideload | Slugslinger | Nightstick | Repugnus | Landmine | Overbite | Dreadwind | Dreadwing | Nightbeat | Landfill | Quickmix | Ricochet | Override | Bludgeon | Thunderwing | Roadblock | Roadhandler | Overload | Storm Cloud | Sledge | Knockout | Tread Bolt | Blackout | Barricade | Treadshot | Skyfall ]

Mirage. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Mirage" toys, although Hasbro would eventually use the name for a Mega Marine G.I. Joe figure that was released in 1993 (with re-releases being available in several variations between 2002 and 2005).
The first time the name "Mirage" was used again on a Transformers toy was the Generation 2 Go-Bot from 1995, a redeco of the Go-Bot Double Clutch which had been released earlier that year. Following this, Hasbro reused the name again on the KB Toys exclusive Machine Wars toy from 1997, which shared its mold with Machine Wars Prowl.
After this, Hasbro started to use the name more frequently again, starting with the Beast Machines toy from 2000, followed by a Spychanger (a redeco of Generation 2 Go-Bot Mirage) that was available in various decos as part of the Robots in Disguise and Universe lines, an Armada Mini-Con (originally available as part of the Race Mini-Con Team) that was available in various decos as part of the Armada, Energon, Universe and Cybertron lines, an Energon Mega Class toy, the Alternators toy, the Classic Deluxe toy and a Robot Heroes figure (available as a two-pack with Starscream), including a clear redeco (available as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Decepticon Sneak Attack" five-pack).
Hasbro originally registered the name "Mirage" back in 1994, following the release of the G.I. Joe figure, but later took the opportunity to use it on Transformers toys as well. Oddly enough, the Generation 2 Go-Bot from 1995 still featured the name as "Mirage™", thus the first toy to sport an ® after the name was the Machine Wars toy from 1997 (with the original release of the RiD Spychanger being referred to on the packaging as "Mirage™", despite the tech spec card sporting an ® after the name).
In general, "Mirage" is Hasbro's standard name for any kind of F1 race car. One theory is that Hasbro want to reuse the name as often as possible in order to firmly establish it as a Transformers trademark, thereby preventing it from ending up as an "everyday" term and Hasbro thereby being required to modify the name into "Autobot Mirage". The same reason is also suggested for the huge output of Transformers toys named "Prowl" between 2003 and 2005.
A compound trademark of sorts that included the name "Mirage", namely "Mirage GT", was used once on a Robots in Disguise toy (a redeco of Beast Machines Mirage) that was available as part of a three-pack with Nightcruz and Scavenger. In addition, the Playskool Go-Bots line featured a toy named "Mirage-Bot" that was available in 2002, sporting a deco that was clearly based on the original 1984 Mirage toy, which would also qualify as a modified trademark that includes the name "Mirage".

Ironhide. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Ironhide" toys, although there was an "Classic Heroes" reissue of the original 1984 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. Ultimately, the first new toy using that name in a long time was the Generation 2 Go-Bot, a redeco of the Go-Bot Motormouth which had been released earlier that year. In addition, there was a G2 "Power Master" toy that was available in US packaging in Australia and New Zealand in 1995 (sporting a ™ after the name on the packaging). However, as the toy was never actually officially available in the USA, it's questionable whether this had any implications on the US trademark at all.
The next "Ironhide" toy actually available in the USA was one of the three components of the Beast Wars Ultra Beast Combiner Magnaboss released in 1997 (referred to as "Ironhide™" on the back of the packaging of Magnaboss). In 2001, Hasbro finally started to put out new "Ironhide" toys on a regular basis, starting with a Spychanger (a redeco of Generation 2 Go-Bot Ironhide) that was available in various decos as part of the Robots in Disguise and Universe lines, followed by a Heroes of Cybertron PVC, a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Dune Runner (available with the Armada Super-Con Terrorsaur), the Energon Mega Class toy, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Energon toy that was only availabe on test markets in 2004, a "Timelines" redeco of the Energon Combat Class Tow-Line toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2005 and various toys released as part of the live action Transformers Movie toyline, namely a Voyager Class toy, a Fast Action Battler, a 3" Titanium figure and a Burger King Kid's Meal toy. A Commemorative Series reissue of the original 1984 toy was also planned in 2004, but was ultimately never released.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Ironhide" after the release of the original toy in 1984, with the first toy(s) sporting a ™ after the name being the Generation 2 Go-Bot (and, technically, the Generation 2 Power Master) from 1995. Hasbro successfully registered "Ironhide" back in 1998, a year after the release of the Beast Wars Magnaboss toy, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name on the packaging being the first KB Toys exclusive redeco of the Robots in Disguise Spychanger from 2002, although the tech spec card for the original release of the RiD Spychanger had already referred to the toy as "Ironhide®" (the packaging, however, still featured the name as "Ironhide™").
The only compound trademark that included the name "Ironhide" thus far was "Energon Ironhide", the Mega Class Ironhide redeco from the Energon toyline. Meanwhile, the "Cannon Blast Ironhide" Fast Action Battler from the live action Transformers Movie toyline features the words "Cannon Blast" in a different font size and color than the trademark "Ironhide®", using it as a purely descriptive term, with no trademark claim whatsoever.

Thundercracker. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Thundercracker" toys, although there was an Action Masters toy (a redeco of Action Master Starscream) which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
The first new "Thundercracker" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the KB Toys exclusive Machine Wars toy in 1997 (which shared its mold with Machine Wars Skywarp). Following that came a Heroes of Cybertron PVC (which was later also available as part of a "Jet Six Pack", exclusive to the Official Transformers Collectors' Convention 2003), a redeco of the Armada Max-Con Starscream toy, a Commemorative Series III reissue of the original 1984 toy, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Armada toy (a redeco of Built to Rule Starscream), a Cybertron Deluxe Class toy, a Wal*Mart exclusive repackage of the Cybertron Deluxe toy available with a "Tiny Tins" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Downshift, a Target exclusive redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe toy available as a two-pack with Cybertron Crosswise (called the "Ground to Air Blast Pack!"), a Legends of Cybertron version of the Cybertron Deluxe toy, a 6" Titanium figure, a 3" Titanium figure (a redeco of the 3" Starscream figure), a Robot Heroes figure (a redeco of Robot Heroes Starscream, available as a two-pack with Autobot Jazz), a "Timelines" redeco of the Classic Deluxe Starscream toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007 and a redeco of the Voyager Class Starscream toy from the live action Transformers Movie toyline.
Hasbro/Kenner trademarked the name "Thundercracker" prior to the release of the Machine Wars toy from 1997, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Thundercracker" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Cybertron Deluxe class toy, as the packaging for the Armada Built to Rule toy had still featured the name as "Thundercracker™".
Of the thirteen "Thundercracker" toys released by Hasbro in the USA (not counting straight repackages within the same line), nearly all share their sculpt with Starscream (or Starscream and Skywarp) toys from the same line, most of them being released as redecos of the Starscream toys in question and the rest being available concurrently with their Starscream counterparts. Only the Machine Wars toy only shared its mold with the Skywarp toy from the same line, whereas the Cybertron Deluxe toy, the Legends of Cybertron toy and the 6" Titanium figure were all initially released as "Thundercracker", although a "Skywarp" redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe and a "Starscream" redeco of the Titanium figure were released later.

Skywarp. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Skywarp" toys, with the first new toy using that name after thirteen years being the KB Toys exclusive Machine Wars toy from 1997 (which shared its mold with Machine Wars Thundercracker).
Following that came a Heroes of Cybertron PVC (which was later also available as part of a "Jet Six Pack", exclusive to the Official Transformers Collectors' Convention 2003), a Commemorative Series IV reissue of the original 1984 toy, a retool of the Armada Max-Con Starscream toy, a redeco of the Beast Machines Deluxe Jetstorm released as part of the Universe line, a redeco of the Legends of Cybertron Starscream toy that was exclusively available at San Diego Comi-Con 2005, a redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe Class Thundercracker toy, a redeco of the Classic Deluxe Starscream toy (available as part of a Target exclusive "Battle for Autobot City" two-pack with Ultra Magnus) and a redeco of the Robot Heroes Starscream figure (available as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Decepticon Sneak Attack" five-pack). A "Skywarp" redeco of the 6" Titanium Starscream figure was also planned, but hasn't been released yet.
Hasbro/Kenner trademarked the name "Skywarp" prior to the release of the Machine Wars toy from 1997, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Skywarp" in 2004, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Cybertron Deluxe toy from 2006, as the instructions for the San Diego Comic-Con exclusive Legends of Cybertron toy (which was available in a clear polybag) still had featured the name as "Skywarp™".
Of the eleven "Skywarp" toys released by Hasbro, all with the exception of the Universe Deluxe (which was a redeco of the Beast Machines Deluxe Jetstorm toy) share their sculpt with either a Starscream or a Thundercracker toy from the same line (in many cases even with both), with the Skywarp toys in question being either released as redecos of those Starscream or Thundercracker toys or being available concurrently with them. Only the Heroes of Cybertron PVC and the Classics toy were available before the respective Thundercracker redecos.
A possible compound term that would have included the name "Skywarp", namely "Skywarp Interceptor", was apparently used by Hasbro as an early working name for the redeco of the Energon Combat Class Starscream toy. However, the final toy ended up being named "Energon Starscream" instead.

Wheeljack. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Wheeljack" toys, with the only new toy using that name after six years being the Action Master from 1990, although there was a "Classic Heroes" reissue of the original 1984 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
Ultimately, the first new "Wheeljack" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA toy after 13 years was a Heroes of Cybertron PVC and the Armada Max-Con toy from 2003, both of which were released around the same time. After that came a KB Toys exclusive redeco of the Robots in Disguise Spychanger Daytonus toy in a "G1" Wheeljack deco (which was later also available at Dollar General and Family Dollar stores in "Universe" packaging) and the Alternators toy. Meanwhile, a Combat Class toy from the Energon line that was clearly designed to resemble the original 1984 Wheeljack toy (which was actually called "Wheeljack" in Takara's "Superlink" version of the toyline in Japan) ended up being named "Downshift" instead (because the Armada toy already posed an instance of a major character being named "Wheeljack" within the same fictional universe, and Hasbro wanted to avoid name reuses on different characters that weren't Mini-Cons within the same continuity), as did a KB Toys exclusive redeco of the Energon toy that was available as part of the Universe line and a Deluxe Class toy from the Cybertron line that also sported a similar head sculpt as Energon Downshift.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Wheeljack" after the release of the original toy in 1984, with the first toy sporting a ™ after the name being the Action Master from 1990. Hasbro successfully registered "Wheeljack" in 2003, with the only toys to sport an ® after the name thus far being the Dollars store exclusive "Universe" re-release of the Spy Changer and the Alternators toy from 2005, as the packaging for the KB Toys exclusive "G1" Spy Changer had still featured the name as "Wheeljack™". Oddly enough, the six KB Toys exclusive "G1" Spy Changers (Optimus Prime, Autobot Jazz, Silverstreak, Prowl, Hoist and Wheeljack himself) featured the name as "Autobot Wheeljack™" on the back of the packaging, even though Wheeljack didn't sport an "Autobot" prefix on the front of his packaging. It's likely that this was merely an error.
During the run of the Armada line, Hasbro's Transformers then head designer Aaron Archer stated that he preferred to use the name "Wheeljack" for Decepticon characters, as it sounded more like an "evil" name to him due to the close similarity to "carjack" (this was also often cited by fans as another possible reason for the Energon Combat Class toy being named "Downshift" instead). Ultimately, however, the Armada Super-Con would remain the only Decepticon toy named "Wheeljack", as all the following toys to sport that name were based on the original 1984 Autobot character again.

Sunstreaker. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Sunstreaker" toys, although there was a "Classic Heroes" reissue of the original 1984 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
Ultimately, the first new "Sunstreaker" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA toy after 19 years was a redeco of the Robots in Disguise Deluxe Prowl toy that was available exclusively at the Official Transformers Collectors' Convention 2003, as part of the "Universe" line. After that, Hasbro originally intended to release a redeco of the Alternators Side Swipe toy as Sunstreaker in 2004, but following the decision that the redecos of the Autobot Alternators would be Decepticons, the second Dodge Viper Alternator ended up as the Decepticon Dead End instead, still sporting a Sunstreaker head sculpt. Following constant demands by the fans, however, Hasbro ultimately decided to release a "Sunstreaker" redeco of Dead End, which finally came out in late 2005. A 3" Titanium figure (a redeco of Titanium Side Swipe) was also planned, but hasn't been released thus far.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Sunstreaker" prior to the release of the OTFCC 2003 exclusive toy from 2003, which was the first and only one to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Sunstreaker" in 2003, with the only toy to sport an ® after the name thus far being the Alternator from 2005.
With the exception of the original 1984 toy (and the European "Classic Heroes" re-release), all "Sunstreaker" toys thus far share their sculpt with a "Side Swipe" toy from the same line, with only the Alternator actually being retooled.

Cliffjumper. Following the release of the original Autobot Mini-Car toy in 1984, which remained on the market in several variations for over a year, came a large gap in the release of new "Cliffjumper" toys. The first new Transformers toy to use the name "Cliffjumper" was a keychain reissue of the original 1984 toy released by Fun-4-All in 2001, with the toy's packaging featuring a ™ after the name. However, since the same packaging also featured a ™ after the term "Autobot", a trademark Hasbro have registered ever since 1985, it's possible that either the keychains' names were trademarked under a different category than "toys", or Fun-4-All didn't actually care for accurate representations of trademarks at all, and thus the ™ claims might ultimately mean nothing.
The first new "Cliffjumper" toy released by Hasbro themselves was a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Ransack, which was available with the Armada Super-Con Cheetor toy in 2003. An Alternators toy based on the original 1984 Cliffjumper toy was also planned (as a Volkswagen New Beetle, a retool of a planned Bumblebee Alternator) in the initial development stages of the Alternators line, but ultimately the toy was never produced, because Volkswagen rejected any involvement in what they considered "war toys". Following that came an Energon Mega Class toy, a Classic Deluxe toy (a redeco of the Classics Bumblebee toy) and a redeco of the Robot Heroes Bumblebee figure (available as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Decepticon Sneak Attack" five-pack). A "Cliffjumper" redeco of the 3" Titanium Bumblebee figure was also planned, but hasn't been released yet, and neither has a "Cliffjumper" redeco of the live Action Transformers Movie Deluxe Class Bumblebee toy (the "Concept Camaro" sculpt). A 6" Titanium figure based on the original 1984 Bumblebee toy was also planned (as a retool of a planned Titanium Bumblebee figure), but ultimately never made it past the early prototype stage due to the premature cancellation of the Titanium line.
Hasbro definitely trademarked the name "Cliffjumper" prior to the release of the Armada Mini-Con from 2003, which was the first toy (unless one counts the keychain by Fun-4-All) to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Cliffjumper" in 2005, with the first and only toy to sport an ® after the name being the Classic Deluxe.
Taking a cue from Palisades and their Transformers statues, Hasbro have started to release "Cliffjumper" toys as straight redecos of previously released Bumblebee toys, in the same fashion "Sunstreaker" toys are usually redecos of existing Side Swipe toys these days.

Windcharger. Following the release of the original Autobot Mini-Car toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Windcharger" toys. The first new Transformers toy to use the name "Windcharger" was a keychain reissue of the original 1984 toy released by Fun-4-All in 2002, with the toy's packaging featuring a ™ after the name. However, since the same packaging also featured a ™ after the term "Autobot", a trademark Hasbro have registered ever since 1985, it's possible that either the keychains' names were trademarked under a different category than "toys", or Fun-4-All didn't actually care for accurate representations of trademarks at all, and thus the ™ claims might ultimately mean nothing.
The first and only new "Windcharger" toy released by Hasbro themselves was the Alternators toy, used as a substitute name for "Overdrive", which is currently not available to Hasbro. Hasbro definitely trademarked the name "Windcharger" prior to the release of the Alternator, which is therefore also the only toy thus far (unless one counts the keychain by Fun-4-All) to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro attempted to register "Windcharger" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2006.

Huffer. Following the release of the original Autobot Mini-Car toy in 1984, the only new "Huffer" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a "Timelines" redeco of the Cybertron Scout Class Armorhide toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007. Oddly enough, the toy's tech spec card features the name as "Huffer®", even though Hasbro apparently haven't attempted to register the name thus far (which would actually make the ® claim illegal).

Laserbeak. Following the release of the original Decepticon Mini-Cassette toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Laserbeak" toys. During the Beast Wars line, Hasbro's subsidiary Kenner released a redeco of the Basic Beast Terrorsaur toy named "Lazorbeak" in 1997, but it seems rather improbable that someone else had actually managed to snatch away the "Laserbeak" name, as "Lazorbeak" would have still qualified for being "confusingly similar" to a theoretical "Laserbeak" trademark by another company. Presumably, Hasbro merely thought that "Lazorbeak" sounded more "hip" than "Laserbeak" during the Ninties.
The first new toy released by Hasbro that was actually named "Laserbeak" was the Armada role-play toy from 2002, followed by a companion piece for a Heroes of Cybertron Megatron PVC (referred to as "Laserbeak™" on the packaging), a companion piece for the Cybertron Voyager Class Soundwave toy (referred to as "Laserbeak®" on the packaging), a "Timelines" redeco of the Energon Terrorcon Divebomb toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2006, a companion piece for the 6" Titanium Soundwave figure and a reissue of the original 1984 toy, available as a companion piece for the Toys'R'Us exclusive Commemorative Edition reissue of the original 1984 Soundwave toy from 2006.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Laserbeak" prior to the release of the Armada toy from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Laserbeak" in 2004, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the companion piece to the Cybertron Voyager toy. Hasbro had previously also registered the spelling "Lazorbeak" in 1998 (following a failed attempt to register the spelling "Lasorbeak" from 1996 which was abandoned in 1998) and filed for a second registration in 2001, but ultimately decided to abandon it in favor of the original spelling. The second registration attempt for "Lazorbeak" was abandoned in 2003, whereas the original registration was cancelled in 2005.
With the exception of the Armada Role-Play toy, the Heroes of Cybertron PVC and the BotCon 2006 exclusive, all "Laserbeak" toys released by Hasbro thus far were either available with a Soundwave toy from the same line, or at least specifically designed to be somehow compatible with the corresponding Soundwave toy.

Buzzsaw. Following the release of the original Decepticon Mini-Cassette toy in 1984 came a large gap in the release of new "Laserbeak" toys. During the Beast Wars line, Hasbro's subsidiary Kenner released a Deluxe Beast toy named "Buzz Saw" in 1996, although there doesn't appear to have been any particular reason behind the different parsing of the name.
Hasbro started to use the name "Buzzsaw" (spelled as one word) again in 2000, starting with a Beast Machines Basic toy, followed by an Armada Mini-Con (originally available as part of the Destruction Mini-Con Team) that was available in various decos as part of the Armada and Energon lines, a Cybertron Deluxe Class toy (a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Cyclonus toy, sporting a color scheme that was based on the Beast Wars Buzz Saw toy) and a "Timelines" redeco of the Energon Terrorcon Divebomb toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2006.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Buzzsaw" prior to the release of the Beast Machines toy from 2000, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name (unless the Beast Wars toy, whose name was featured as "Buzz Saw™" on the packaging, also counts). Hasbro successfully registered "Buzzsaw" in 2001, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Mini-Con from the Armada Destruction Mini-Con Team that was available in 2002.
Of the seven "Buzssaw" toys (or eight, if Beast Wars Buzz Saw counts) released by Hasbro thus far, only the original 1984 toy and the BotCon 2006 exclusive Timelines toy shared their sculpt with a "Laserbeak" toy.

Jetfire. Following the release of the original toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Jetfire" toys, with the first new toy using that name after ten years being the Generation 2 Cyberjet from 1995. After that came yet another large gap.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Jetfire" more frequently again in 2002, starting with the Armada Giga-Con toy (which was later also available as a KMart exclusive two-pack with a "Powerlinx" redeco of the Super-Base Optimus Prime toy), followed by a "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada toy, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Armada toy, the Energon Mega Class toy, the Cybertron Ultra Class toy, a Burger King Kid's Meal toy representation of the Cybertron Ultra, the Legends of Cybertron version of the Ultra toy, a 6" Titanium figure, the Classics Voyager toy, a re-release of the Legends of Cybertron toy (available as part of a Target exclusive four-pack with Megatron, Soundwave and Optimus Prime) and a "Classics" redeco of the Legends of Cybertron Thundercracker toy, which has thus far only been available from online retailers and specialty stores.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Jetfire" prior to the release of the Generation 2 Cyberjet from 1995, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro attempted to register "Jetfire" in 2001, prior to the release of the Armada Giga-Con toy, but ultimately abandoned that attempt in 2003. Immediately following that, Hasbro started a second registration attempt and thus finally successfully registered "Jetfire" in 2004, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name on the packaging being the the Legends of Cybertron toy from 2005, although the instructions for the Cybertron Ultra toy had already referred to the toy as "Jetfire®" (the packaging, however, still featured the name as "Jetfire™").
Both "Powerlinx" versions of Armada Jetfire (the mass retail redeco and the Kmart exclusive repackage of the original deco from the two-pack with Optimus Prime) were referred to on the packaging as "Powerlinx™ Jetfire™", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term.

Inferno. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Inferno", although there was a figure from Hasbro's "C.O.P.S." line using the name which was available in 1989. The first new Transformers toy to use the name "Inferno" was the Action Master from 1990. In addition, there was a "Classic Heroes" reissue of the original 1984 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. After that came the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy in 1993. Following that, Hasbro released a S.K.A.R. figure named "Inferno" that was available as part of the G.I. Joe Extreme line in 1995, and a second version of that figure which was available with the with the Spitfire Battering Platform that same year. Next came the Beast Wars Mega Beast toy that was released in 1996. Furthermore, a Beast Wars Transmetal toy from 1998 that was clearly supposed to represent a new incarnation of the Beast Wars Inferno character was originally also intended to be named "Inferno" (Takara's Beast Wars Metals version actually retained that name), but eventually ended up being named "Scavenger" instead.
Ultimately, the first new "Inferno" toy to be released by Hasbro was a Mini-Con from the Armada line, which was available as the Armada Super-Con Thrust's Mini-Con companion in 2003. Following that came a Commemorative Series V reissue of the original 1985 Inferno toy, a "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con (available with Powerlinx Thrust), a Universe Deluxe (with the toy sporting a deco that was based on the Generation 1 Red Alert toy), an Energon Combat Class toy, another redeco of the Armada Mini-Con that was available with the Wal*Mart exclusive Universe Sunstorm toy, and a "Built to Rule" representation of the Energon toy that was only availabe on test markets in 2004. The last time Hasbro used the name "Inferno" thus far was a G.I. Joe figure form the Sigma Six line that was available in 2007.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Inferno" after the release of the original toy in 1985, with the first toy sporting a ™ after the name being the C.O.P.S. toy from 1989. Hasbro successfully registered "Inferno" back in 1996, following the release of the G.I. Joe figure, to be used for "toy action figures, toy vehicles and video game cartridges". Hasbro attempted to register the name for a second time in 2001, this time with a slightly different definition of possible uses, namely "toy action figures, toy vehicles and toy robots convertible into other visual forms", but ultimately abandoned that attempt in 2002. Still, after the original version of the Armada Mini-Con from 2003 had still featured the name as "Inferno™", Hasbro's legal department apparently came to the conclusion that the definition for the original registration was sufficient enough to apply to Transformers toys as well, and thus all subsequent "Inferno" toys, starting with the "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con and the Commemorative Series reissue from 2003, which both came out around the same time, would finally sport an ® after the name.
The "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con was referred to on the packaging as "Powerlinx™ Inferno®", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term. However, Hasbro did use two compound names that included the term "Inferno", namely "Raging Inferno City" for a Micro Machines playset that was released in 2003 and "Inferno Fury" for a Hyperfury kit from their short-lived Xevoz line that was released in 2004. Hasbro successfully registered "Inferno Fury" in 2005, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet. Hasbro attempted to register "Raging Inferno City" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt later that same year.

Red Alert. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Red Alert" toys, with the first new toy using that name after seventeen years being the Armada Max-Con from 2002. Following that came a McDonald's Happy Meal toy representation of the Armada toy, a Commemorative Series IV reissue of the original 1985 toy, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Armada toy, the "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada toy, a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Protectobot, the Cybertron Deluxe Class toy (which was later also available as a Wal*Mart exclusive repackage with a "Tiny Tins" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Dirt Boss and as a Target exclusive two-pack with Cybertron Sideways, called the "Critical Path Pack!"), a Burger King Kid's Meal toy representation of the Cybertron Deluxe, the Cybertron Ultra Class toy (which was also available under the name "Cybertron Defense Red Alert") and a Legends of Cybertron version of the Cybertron Ultra toy.
Two toys released as part of the Universe line, a Wal*Mart exclusive redeco of the Robots in Disguise Spychanger Prowl 2 (available as a two-pack with an Optimus Prime Spychanger) and a redeco of the Robots in Disguise Deluxe Prowl toy available as part of the mass retail Universe Deluxe assortment, sported decos that were both clearly based on the 1985 Red Alert toy, and yet the Spychanger ended up being named "Prowl", while the Deluxe was named "Inferno".
Hasbro trademarked the name "Red Alert" prior to the release of the Armada Max-Con toy from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Red Alert" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name on its packaging being the Cybertron Deluxe Class toy, although the Universe Micromaster's instructions already referred to the toy as "Red Alert®" (the packaging, however, still featured the name as "Red Alert™").
During the Armada and Cybertron days, "Red Alert" was essentially Hasbro's standard name for Autobot medics, as "Ratchet" would have been only possible as the compound term "Autobot Ratchet", and Hasbro preferred to keep the "Autobot someone" names out of the "main" Transformers toylines prior to the live action Transformers Movie toyline.
The "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Max-Con was referred to on the packaging as "Powerlinx™ Red Alert™", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term. Meanwhile, the Cybertron Ultra Class toy was available in two different packaging variants, one of them sporting the name "Red Alert®", the other one featuring a compound term, "Cybertron Defense Red Alert™".

Smokescreen. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Smokescreen" toys, with the first new toy using that name after nine years being the companion to the Generation 2 Dreadwing toy from 1994 (referred to as "Smokescreen™" on the back of the packaging and in the instructions). After that came yet another large gap.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Smokescreen" more frequently again in 2002, starting with the Armada Super-Con toy, followed by a McDonald's Happy Meal toy representation of the Armada toy, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Armada toy, a Commemorative Series VI reissue of the original 1985 toy, the Alternators toy, a Universe redeco of the Armada toy that was available as part of a "Battle in a Box" two-pack with Ransack (a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Hoist toy), a 3" Titanium figure and a redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe Crosswise toy. A Universe redeco of the Armada Super-Con Hot Shot toy that would have been available as part of a "Battle in a Box" two-pack with Drench (a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Wheeljack toy) was also planned, but was ultimately never released.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Smokescreen" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1994, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Smokescreen" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Universe "Battle in a Box" toy.
In addition, Hasbro also released a G.I. Joe vehicle as part of the Spy Troops line in 2003 that used a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Smokes Screen Transport" (referred to on the packaging as "Smoke Screen™ Transport"), which was also available as part of a Costco exclusive "Battle in a Box" set with the Cobra Ringneck in 2004.

Hoist. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Hoist" toys, with the first new toy using that name after twelve years being the KB Toys exclusive Machine Wars toy from 1997 (which shared its mold with Machine Wars Hubcap). After that came yet another large gap.
The next "Hoist" toy released by Hasbro was the Armada Super-Con toy from 2003, followed by a Commemorative Series V reissue of the original 1985 toy, a KB Toys exclusive redeco of the Robots in Disguise Spychanger X-Brawn toy in a "G1" Hoist deco (which was later also available at Dollar General and Family Dollar stores in "Universe" packaging) and another Dollar Stores exclusive "Universe" Spy Changer, this time a repackaged version of the second of the two KB Toys exclusive clear redecos of the Robots in Disguise Spychanger Ironhide.
Hasbro/Kenner trademarked the name "Hoist" prior to the release of the Machine Wars toy from 1997, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Hoist" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Dollar Stores exclusive repackage of the Spy Changer toy from 2005, as the KB Toys exclusive "G1" version of the Spy Changer from 2004 still had featured the name as "Hoist™".

Perceptor. Following the release of the original toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Perceptor" toys, with the first new toy using that name after seventeen years being the combined form of the Armada Street Action Mini-Con Team from 2002 (referred to as "Perceptor™" on the back of the packaging and in the instructions). After that came a Heroes of Cybertron PVC, a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con combiner available with the Wal*Mart exclusive Universe Sunstorm toy (referred to as "Perceptor®" on the back of the packaging and in the instructions), the combined form of the Energon Perceptor Mini-Con Team, a repackaged version of the Energon toy in "Universe" packaging that was exclusively available at Family Dollar, Dollar General and Ocean State Job Lot stores, and a "Classics" redeco of the Legends of Cybertron Red Alert toy.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Perceptor" prior to the release of the Armada Street Action Mini-Con Team from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Perceptor" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Universe redeco of the Armada toy that came with the Wal*Mart exclusive Sunstorm toy from 2004, as the Heroes of Cybertron PVC still had featured the name as "Perceptor™".
The Energon toy was officially called "Perceptor® Mini-Con Team™", with the name "Perceptor" using a significantly larger font size than "Mini-Con Team", and likewise, the "Universe" repackage was officially called "Mini-Con® Team Perceptor®", again with the term "Mini-Con Team" using a significantly smaller font size than the name "Perceptor", hence making both cases instances of a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term.

Sludge. Following the release of the original Dinobot toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Sludge" toys, although there was a "Classic Dinobots" reissue of the original 1985 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but as the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. However, Hasbro did release a G.I. Joe figure in the USA that was available as part of the "Eco-Warriors" sub-line in 1991, and which used a compound name that included the term "Sludge", namely "Sludge Viper".
The only new Transformers toy named "Sludge" to be released by Hasbro in the USA thus far was a redeco of the Beast Wars Neo Sling toy (which was originally only released in Japan) released as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Dinobots" sub-line in 2003 (available as part of a two-pack with Snarl). Hasbro trademarked the name "Sludge" prior to the release of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Dinobots" toy, which is therefore also the only toy thus far thus far to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro attempted to register "Sludge" in 2002, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005. Hasbro trademarked the name "Sludge Viper" prior to the release of the G.I. Joe figure from 1991, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro successfully registered "Sludge Viper", to be used for "toy action figures", in 1992, but ultimately abandoned the name in 2003.

Beachcomber. Following the release of the original Autobot Mini-Vehicle toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Beachcomber", although Hasbro released a My Little Pony toy (more specifically, a Pretty 'n Pearly Baby Sea Pony) named "Beachcomber" that was available in 1986.
The first time Hasbro actually used the name on a Transformers toy again was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy released in 1993. The only other Transformers toy since then to sport the name was the Energon Mega Class toys from 2004, although Hasbro released another My Little Pony toy (a Dream Design Pony from the "Butterfly Island" sub-line) using the name in 2005.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Beachcomber" prior to the release of the My Little Pony toy from 1986, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro attempted to register the name "Beachcomber" twice in 2004, once for the My Little Pony line and once for the Transformers line, but ultimately abandoned both attempts in 2005.

Seaspray. Following the release of the original Autobot Mini-Vehicle toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Seaspray", although Hasbro released a My Little Pony toy (more specifically, a Sea Sparkle Baby Sea Pony) that featured a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Sea Spray", which was available in 1987.
The first and only time thus far Hasbro actually used the name "Seaspray" on a Transformers toy again was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy released in 1993, although Hasbro released another My Little Pony toy (a Dazzle Bright Pony from the "Butterfly Island" sub-line) in 2005, this time actually spelling the name as a single word, "Seaspray".
Hasbro originally trademarked the compound term "Sea Spray" prior to the release of the My Little Pony toy from 1987, which was the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro trademarked the single term "Seaspray" prior to the release of the Transformers Generation 2 toy from 1993, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro attempted to register the spelling "Sea Spray" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2006.

Bonecrusher. Following the release of the original Constructicon toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Bonecrusher" toys, although there was a Blue Army Special Forces Team member from Hasbro's Army Ants line that used a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Bone Crusher", which was available in 1987. Meanwhile, the first new Transformers toy after eight years to use the name "Bonecrusher" was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy released in 1993, which was available in two different color variations. The next "Bonecrusher" toy after that was the Beast Wars Deluxe Beast toy from 1997.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Bonecrusher" more frequently again in 2002, starting with an Armada Mini-Con (available as part of the Armada Land Military Mini-Con Team), a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Constructicon, an Energon Powerlinx Combiner that was part of the Constructicon Maximus team, a Universe redeco of the Robots in Disguise Wedge toy that was available as a Target exclusive two-pack with Scavenger, a redeco of the Energon toy that was available as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Classics" Constructicon Devastator giftset, and the Movie Deluxe Class toy (which was later also available as part of a Sam's Club exclusive three-pack with Decepticon Brawl and Autobot Jazz).
Hasbro trademarked the name "Bonecrusher" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1993, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Bonecrusher" in 1998, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Armada Mini-Con from 2002.
Of the nine (or eleven, depending on whether the color variant for Generation 2 Bonecrusher and the Sam's Club exclusive repackage of the Movie Deluxe toy also count) Bonecrusher toys released by Hasbro thus far, six (seven including the G2 color variant) were members of a "Constructicon" team of sorts.

Scavenger. Following the release of the original Constructicon toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Scavenger" toys, with the first new toy using that name after eight years being the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy released in 1993, which was available in two different color variations. The next "Scavenger" toy after that was the Beast Wars Mega Beast Transmetal toy from 1998 (presumably used as a substitute name for "Inferno" for whatever reason), followed by the Beast Machines Basic toy from 1999.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Scavenger" more frequently again in 2002, starting with a Robots in Disguise toy (a redeco of Beast Machines Scavenger that was available as part of a three-pack with Nightcruz and Mirage GT), followed by the Armada Max-Con toy, a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Constructicon, a Universe redeco of the Robots in Disguise Grimlock toy that was available as a Target exclusive two-pack with Bonecrusher, and a redeco of the Energon Steamhammer toy that was available as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Classics" Constructicon Devastator giftset.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Scavenger" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1993, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Scavenger" in 2001, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Robots in Disguise toy from 2002.
Of the nine (or ten, depending on whether the color variant for Generation 2 Scavenger also counts) Scavenger toys released by Hasbro thus far, five (six including the G2 color variant) were members of a "Constructicon" team of sorts. In addition, the Armada Max-Con also sports a "Constructicon"-esque color scheme.

Long Haul. Following the release of the original Constructicon toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Long Haul" toys, with the first new toy using that name after eight years being the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy released in 1993, which was available in two different color variations. Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Long Haul" more frequently again in 2004, starting with a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Constructicon, followed by a Universe redeco of the Robots in Disguise Heavy Load toy that was available as a Target exclusive two-pack with Hightower, and a redeco of the Energon Duststorm/Wideload sculpt that was available as part of the Wal*Mart exclusive "Classics" Constructicon Devastator giftset.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Long Haul" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1993, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Long Haul" in 2006, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the component of the Wal*Mart exclusive Constructicon Devastator combiner from 2007.
All of the five (or six, depending on whether the color variant for Generation 2 Long Haul also counts) Long Haul toys released by Hasbro thus far were members of a "Constructicon" team of sorts.

Astrotrain. Following the release of the original Triple Changer toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Astrotrain" toys, although there was a "Classic Triple Changer" reissue of the original 1985 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
The next time the name "Astrotrain" was brought up again was in 2003, when 3H Enterprises intended to release redecos of the Robots in Disguise Bullet Train team (Railspike, Rapid Run and Midnight Express) that were supposed to be exclusively available at the Official Transformers Collectors' Convention 2004, with the intended names being "Astrotrain", "Steamhammer" and either "Loco" or "Cowcatcher", and the combined form being supposed to be called "Dominus Trannis". However, Hasbro later declared the Bullet Train team toys unavailable for the convention, so those toys ultimately never came out. Thus, the first new "Astrotrain" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the KB Toys exclusive Commemorative Series IX reissue from 2005 (which had originally been intended for a 2004 release, exclusive to Toys'R'Us). After that came the Classic Deluxe toy and the Official Transformers Collectors' Club exclusive "Timelines" redeco of the Armada Giga-Con Jetfire toy (which had originally been intended to be released as a Toys'R'Us exclusive Universe toy named "Spacewarp" in 2004).
Hasbro trademarked the name "Astrotrain" prior to the release of the Commemorative Series reissue from 2005, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Ramjet. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Ramjet" toys, with the first new toy using that name after eight years being the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1985 toy in 1993. After that came yet another large gap.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Ramjet" more frequently again in 2003, starting with an Armada Mini-Con that was available with the Armada Giga-Con Tidal Wave toy. Following that came a redeco of the Mini-Con that was available with the Energon redeco of Tidal wave, a Universe redeco of the Armada Skywarp toy that was exclusively available at Toys'R'Us stores, a Cybertron Mini-Con (a redeco of the Energon Mini-Con Skyboom from the Energon Saber Team, available as a two-pack with Scythe) and the Classic Deluxe toy (a redeco of Classic Deluxe Starscream). In addition, there was a redeco of the Legends of Cybertron Starscream toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2005, but since the toy came in a clear polybag and the instructions were recycled from the San Diego Comic-Con 2005 exclusive Legends of Cybertron Sykwarp toy (hence featuring the name "Skywarp"), it's uncertain whether this counts as a use of the name or not. A Commemorative Series reissue of the original 1985 toy was also planned in 2004, but was ultimately never released.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Ramjet" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1993, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Ramjet" in 2004, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Cybertron Mini-Con.
Of the eight "Ramjet" toys released by Hasbro thus far, five were redecos of a Starscream toy from the same line. In addition, the Cybertron Mini-Con is attributed to the same team as the Thrust and Sunstorm Mini-Cons that shipped in the same wave, although they don't share the same sculpt.

Thrust. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Thrust" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Beast Machines Deluxe toy from 2000. After that came a McDonald's Happy Meal toy representation of the Beast Machines toy, the Armada Super-Con toy, the "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada toy, a Cybertron Mini-Con (a redeco of the Energon Mini-Con Wreckage from the Energon Saber Team, available as a two-pack with Anti-Blaze) and a "Timelines" redeco of the Classic Deluxe Starscream toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007. A Commemorative Series reissue of the original 1985 toy was also planned in 2004, but was ultimately never released.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Thrust" prior to the release of the Beast Machines toy from 2000, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Thrust" in 2001, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Armada Super-Con toy.
The "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Super-Con was referred to on the packaging as "Powerlinx™ Thrust®", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term.
Of the seven "Thrust" toys released by Hasbro thus far, only two were redecos of an existing Starscream toy.

Dirge. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Dirge" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being a Heroes of Cybertron PVC released in 2003. Following thast came a Commemorative Series VII reissue of the original 1985 toy, a "Timelines" redeco of the Beast Wars Basic Beast Buzzclaw toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2005, and a "Timelines" redeco of the Classic Deluxe Starscream toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Dirge" prior to the release of the Heroes of Cybertron PVC from 2003, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Dirge" in 2005, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the BotCon 2007 exclusive "Timelines" toy.
Of the four "Dirge" toys released by Hasbro thus far, three were redecos of an existing Starscream toy.

Downshift. Following the release of the original Omnibot toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Downshift" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being an Armada Mini-Con (originally available in 2002 as part of the Race Mini-Con Team) that was available in various decos as part of the Armada, Energon, Universe and Cybertron lines, an Energon Combat Class toy, a Universe redeco of the Energon toy that was exclusively available from KB Toys stores, and a Cybertron Deluxe Class toy.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Downshift" prior to the release of the Armada Mini-Con from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Downshift" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Energon Combat Class toy from 2004.
None of the "Downshift" toys released by Hasbro from 2002-onwards were based on the original 1985 toy or character. Instead, most of them were merely variations of the Armada Mini-Con sculpt, whereas the Energon toy was clearly designed to resemble the original 1984 Wheeljack toy (and, in addition, the toy was actually called "Wheeljack" in Takara's "Superlink" version of the toyline in Japan), but because Hasbro had already released a Super-Con toy named "Wheeljack" during the Armada line, which posed an instance of a major character being named "Wheeljack" within the same fictional universe (and Hasbro wanted to avoid name reuses on different characters that weren't Mini-Cons within the same continuity), the Energon toy ended up being named "Downshift" again, as did the Universe redeco and the Cybertron toy, which also sported a similar head sculpt as Energon Downshift.

Kickback. Following the release of the original Insecticon toy in 1985, the only new "Kickback" toy released by Hasbro thus far was an Energon Powerlinx Combiner from 2005 that was part of the Bruticus Maximus team. Hasbro trademarked the name "Kickback" prior to the release of the Energon toy, which was also the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro sucessfully registered "Kickback" in 2006, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Ransack. Following the release of the original Deluxe Insecticon toy in 1985 came a large gap in the release of new "Ransack" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Generation 2 Rotor Force toy from 1994. After that came yet another large gap.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Ransack" more frequently again in 2003, starting with an Armada Mini-Con (originally available in 2002 as part of the Adventure Mini-Con Team) that was available in various decos as part of the Armada and Energon lines, followed by a Universe redeco of the Armada Super-Con Hoist toy that was available as part of a "Battle in a Box" two-pack with Smokescreen (a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Smokescreen toy) and a Cybertron Scout Class toy.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Ransack" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1994, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Ransack" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Universe "Battle in a Box" toy.
The only compound trademark of sorts thus far that included the name "Ransack", namely "Ransack GTS", was used once on a redeco of the Cybertron Scout Class toy.

Air Raid. Following the release of the original Aerialbot toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Air Raid". Instead, Hasbro released a helicopter vehicle named "Air Raid COPS Helicopter" as part of their "C.O.P.S." line in 1988, which sported a ™ after the name "Air Raid". In addition, there was a "Classic Aerialbots" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
The first new "Air Raid" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1986 toy that was released in 1994, followed by the Generation 2 Cyberjet from 1995. After that came yet another large gap.
The only other three "Air Raid" toys released by Hasbro since then were a Universe redeco of the Generation 2 Cyberjet that was available as a two-pack with Wind Sheer in 2004, a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Aerialbot from 2006 and a Target exclusive redeco of the Energon Omnicon Skyblast toy released as part of the live action Transformers Movie line in 2007.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Air Raid" prior to the release of the C.O.P.S. helicopter from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Air Raid" in 2005, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the Target exclusive "Movie" Scout Class toy from 2007, as the KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Aerialbot from 2006 had still featured the name as "Air Raid™".

Skydive. Following the release of the original Aerialbot toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Skydive" toys, although there were a "Classic Aerialbots" reissue of the original 1986 toy and a Predator toy which were exclusively available in Europe in 1990 and 1992, respectively, but since neither toy was released in the USA, they had no implications on the US trademark.
The first new "Skydive" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1986 toy that was released in 1994. After that came yet another large gap.
The only other three "Skydive" toys released by Hasbro since then were a Beast Machines Deluxe toy from 2000, a Universe redeco of the Beast Machines toy that was available in 2004 and a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Aerialbot from 2006.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Skydive" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1994, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Skydive" in 2004, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the Universe Micromaster from 2006.

Fireflight. Following the release of the original Aerialbot toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Fireflight" toys, although there was a "Classic Aerialbots" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
The first new "Skydive" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1986 toy that was released in 1994. After that came yet another large gap.
The only other two "Fireflight" toys released by Hasbro since then were a Universe redeco of the Beast Machines Spy Streak toy that was available in 2004 and a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Aerialbot from 2006.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Fireflight" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1994, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Streetwise. Following the release of the original Protectobot toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Streetwise" toys, although there was a "Classic Protectobots" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. On the US side of things, a Generation 2 re-release of the original toy was supposed to be released in 1994 and even made it to the sample packaging stage, but ultimately never came out. Therefore, the only new "Streetwise" toy released by Hasbro in the USA thus far was a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Protectobot from 2004.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Streetwise" prior to the intended release of the Generation 2 toy in 1994, which ultimately never came out. Thus, the first and only actually released "Streetwise" toy to sport a ™ after the name was the Universe Micromaster from 2004. Hasbro attempted to register "Streetwise" in 2003, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005.

Hot Spot. Following the release of the original Protectobot toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Hot Spot" toys, although there was a "Classic Protectobots" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. On the US side of things, a Generation 2 re-release of the original toy was supposed to be released in 1994, but ultimately never came out (and unlike the four Protectobot limbs, G2 Hot Spot apparently never even made it to the sample packaging stage). However, "Hot Spot" was also the name of a board game released by Parker Brothers in 1961, a company that was bought up by Hasbro in 1991. In 2001, Hasbro registered the name "Hot Spot" to be used for "equipment sold as a unit for playing an electronic parlor game", although it's unclear in what context the name was actually used. The only new Transformers toy released by Hasbro in the USA to use the name "Hot Spot" thus far was a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Protectobot from 2004. In addition, 3H Enterprises also intended to release a redeco of the Robots in Disguise Super Optimus Prime toy that was supposed to be exclusively available at the Official Transformers Collectors' Convention 2005, using a deco based on the original 1986 Hot Spot toy (with the toy's "super mode" being supposed to be named "Defensor"), but since 3H Enterprises lost the license to hold an official Transformers convention in 2004 and went bankrupt shortly afterwards, the toy would ultimately never be released. Meanhwile, a company named ThinkFun released a game named "Hot Spot" in 2006, which should have theoretically clashed with Hasbro's registration for the name.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Hot Spot" prior to the intended release of the Generation 2 toy in 1994 (referred to as "Hot Spot™" on the packaging for the four G2 Protectobot limbs First Aid, Groove, Streetwise and Blades), which ultimately never came out. Thus, the first and only actually released "Hot Spot" toy to sport a ™ after the name was the Universe Micromaster from 2004, since Hasbro's registration for the name from 2001 didn't include "toys" or "action figures" in the definition of possible uses. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name for further uses as part of the Transformers line.
Interestingly enough, Bandai released a two-pack of toys named "Bumble Bee" and "Hot Spot" as part of their "Teen Titans Go!" line in 2005, with the packaging sporting a ™ after each name. However, since Bandai didn't actually own the characters in question, but had merely licensed them from DC Comics, it's possible that Hasbro couldn't file legal action against Bandai directly.

First Aid. Following the release of the original Protectobot toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "First Aid" toys, although there was a "Classic Protectobots" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. On the US side of things, a Generation 2 re-release of the original toy was supposed to be released in 1994 and even made it to the sample packaging stage, but ultimately never came out. Therefore, the only new "First Aid" toy released by Hasbro in the USA thus far was a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Protectobot from 2004.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "First Aid" prior to the intended release of the Generation 2 toy in 1994, which ultimately never came out. Thus, the first and only actually released "First Aid" toy to sport a ™ after the name was the Universe Micromaster from 2004. Hasbro attempted to register "First Aid" in 2003, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005.

Dead End. Following the release of the original Stunticon toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Dead End" toys, although there was a "Classic Stunticons" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1990, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. On the US side of things, a Generation 2 re-release of the original toy was supposed to be released in 1994 and even made it to the sample packaging stage, but ultimately never came out.
The first new "Dead End" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was a Mini-Con from the Armada line, which was available as the Armada Chaos Bringer Unicron's Mini-Con companion in 2003, followed by an Energon redeco of the Mini-Con (available with Energon Unicron) and, lastly, the Alternators toy from 2004.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Dead End" prior to the intended release of the Generation 2 toy in 1994, which ultimately never came out. Thus, the first actually released "Dead End" toy to sport a ™ after the name was the Armada Mini-Con from 2003. Hasbro sucessfully registered "Dead End" in 2005, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Swindle. Following the release of the original Combaticon toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Swindle" toys, although there was a "Classic Combaticons" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. The first new "Swindle" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1986 toy that was released in 1994. After that came yet another large gap.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Swindle" more frequently again in 2002, starting with a Mini-Con from the Armada line, which was available as the Armada Max-Con Starscream's Mini-Con companion, followed by a "Built to Rule" representation of the Armada toy (available with a "Built to Rule" version of Starscream), the Alternators toy, a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Railbot, a redeco of the Cybertron Scout Class Hardtop toy and a Deluxe Class toy from the live action Transformers Movie toyline.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Swindle" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1994, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Swindle" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Alternator from 2004.

Bruticus. Following the release of the original toy in 1986 (assembled from the five Combaticons, presumably not available as a giftset in the USA) came a large gap in the release of new "Bruticus" toys, although there was a "Classic Combaticons" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark. The first new "Bruticus" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the Generation 2 re-release of the original 1986 toy that was released in 1994. After that came yet another large gap. The only other "Bruticus" toy released by Hasbro since then was a Deluxe toy from the Robots in Disguise line that was available in 2001.
Hasbro originally registered the name "Bruticus" in 1987, after the release of the original toy, but as they wouldn't used it for eight years, the the registration expired in 1993. Oddly enough, Hasbro didn't file for it again, but simply featured the name as "Bruticus™" on the packaging for each of the five individual G2 Combaticons (Brawl, Swindle, Blast Off, Vortex and Onslaught) from 1994. Likewise, RiD Bruticus from 2001 sported a ™ after the name as well. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name again.
In 2005, Hasbro used a compound term that included the name "Bruticus", namely "Bruticus Maximus", for the combined form of the Destruction Team from the Energon toyline, referred to by name on the packaging for each of the five individual components (Stormcloud, Blight, Blackout, Kickback and Barricade).

Springer. Following the release of the original Triple Changer toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Springer" toys, although there was a "Classic Triple Changer" reissue of the original 1986 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
Ultimately, the first and only new "Springer" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was a "Timelines" redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe Class Cybertron Defense Hot Shot toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007. Oddly enough, the toy's tech spec card features the name as "Springer®", even though Hasbro apparently haven't attempted to register the name thus far (which would actually make the ® claim illegal).

Blurr. Following the release of the original Autobot Car toy in 1986 came a Targetmaster version of the toy (still called simply "Blurr") that was available one year later, in 1987. After that came a large gap in the release of new "Blurr" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Armada Super-Con toy from 2002, followed by a retool of the Armada toy (sporting a new head sculpt and a color scheme that were both based on the original 1986 toy) released as part of the Cybertron line in 2005.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Blurr" prior to the release of the Armada toy from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Blurr" in 2003, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the Cybertron toy from 2005.

Cyclonus. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1986 came a Targetmaster version of the toy (still called simply "Cyclonus") that was available one year later, in 1987. After that came a large gap in the release of new "Cyclonus" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being an "Extended Universe" redeco of the Beast Machines Ultra Jetstorm toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2002, followed by the Armada Super-Con toy, a Heroes of Cybertron PVC, a McDonald's Happy Meal toy representation of the Armada toy, the "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada toy, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Armada toy (available as a two-pack with "Built to Rule" Megatron) and a KB Toys exclusive redeco of the Armada toy released as part of the Energon line.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Cyclonus" prior to the release of the BotCon exclusive "Expanded Universe" toy from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Cyclonus" in 2003, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the KB Toys exclusive Energon toy from 2004.
The "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Super-Con was referred to on the packaging as "Powerlinx™ Cyclonus™", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term.

Scourge. Following the release of the original Decepticon Plane toy in 1986 came a Targetmaster version of the toy (still called simply "Scourge") that was available one year later, in 1987. After that came a large gap in the release of new "Scourge" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Beast Wars Deluxe Transmetal 2 toy from 1999, followed by the Robots in Disguise Spychanger (available as a two-pack with Spychanger X-Brawn), the larger Robots in Disguise toy that was exclusively available from Toys'R'Us stores, the KB Toys exclusive RiD "Destructicon" toy (a redeco of the Generation 2 Hero Optimus Prime toy), the Cybertron Ultra Class toy, the Legends of Cybertron toy and a 6" Titanium figure.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Scourge" prior to the release of the Beast Wars toy from 1999, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Scourge" in 2002, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Cybertron Ultra Class toy from 2005, as the KB Toys exclusive Robots in Disguise "Destructicon" toy from 2004 had still featured the name as "Scourge™".
Of the seven "Scourge" toys released by Hasbro after 1987, only the 6" Titanium figure was actually based on the original 1986 toy. The three Robots in Disguise toys were essentially all black "evil" redecos of Optimus Prime toys from previous lines (although the Spychanger, who was a downscaled version of the larger Toys'R'Us exclusive toy, was released as "Scourge" first, with an "Optimus Prime" redeco only being released two years later), whereas the Takara's "Galaxy Force" version of the Cybertron Ultra Class toy (which the legends of Cybertron was a downscaled version of) was called "Flame Convoy" in Japan, hence again (at least somewhat) fitting the "Evil Prime/Convoy" theme.
The only compound trademark that included the name "Scourge" thus far was "Cryo Scourge", the redeco of the Cybertron Ultra Class toy. Meanwhile, the KB Toys exclusive RiD "Destructicon" toy was referred to on the packaging and in the instructions as "Destructicon™ Scourge™", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term.

Broadside. Following the release of the original Triple Changer toy in 1986, the only new "Broadside" toys released by Hasbro thus far were an Armada Mini-Con (a redeco of the Mini-Con Knock Out from the Land Military Mini-Con Team, originally available as part of the Night Attack Mini-Con Team), a re-release of the Mini-Con that was exclusively available from Toys'R'Us and Wal*Mart stores in 2004, as part of an Energon Mini-Con six-pack, and a "Classics" Mini-Con that was available as part of the Demolition Team in 2006.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Broadside" prior to the release of the Armada Mini-Con from 2003, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Broadside" in 2004, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the "Classics" Mini-Con from 2006.

Razorclaw. Following the release of the original Predacon toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Razorclaw" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Beast Wars Basic Beast toy from 1997, followed by a "Video Pack" redeco of the Beast Wars toy from 1998, a Universe redeco of the Ultra Transmetal 2 Tigerhawk toy released in 2003 and a Cybertron Mini-Con from 2005 (a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Thunderwing from the Air Military Mini-Con Team, available as a two-pack with Steamhammer, and later as part of a repackage of the two Mini-Cons that were exclusively available from Target stores with Cybertron Evac in 2006). In addition, Hasbro also released a Xevoz Meta-Beast toy named "Razorclaw" that was available in 2003, and a G.I. Joe figure named "Razorclaw" that was available as part of the Valor vs. Venom line, first as a two-pack with Heavy Duty in 2004 and later as a two-pack with Tunnel Rat in 2005.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Razorclaw" prior to the release of the Beast Wars toy from 1997, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Razorclaw" still in 1997, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Universe toy from 2003, as the Beast Wars "Video Pack" toy from 1998 had still featured the name as "Razorclaw™".
A Beast Wars Deluxe Mutant toy released in 2000 featured a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Razor Claw", sporting a ™ after the name.

Rampage. Following the release of the original Predacon toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Rampage". Instead, Hasbro released a minor redeco of the G.I. Joe Heavy Metal figure through their Hasbro Direct mail order service in 1989, which was renamed into "Rampage" for this release. Another "Rampage" toy was also planned for the G.I. Joe Extreme line from 1995, but would ultimately never be released. The first and only time Hasbro actually used the name on a Transformers toy again was the Beast Wars Ultra Transmetal toy from 1998. Since then, the only other "Rampage" toy released by Hasbro was yet another G.I. Joe toy from 2003, this time as a redeco of the Beach Head figure from 2002.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Rampage" prior to the release of the Hasbro Direct exclusive G.I. Joe figure from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Rampage" in 1997, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the G.I. Joe figure from 2003, as the Beast Wars toy from 1998 had still featured the name as "Rampage™".
The term "Rampage" was also used as part of the name of the 2004 G.I. Joe Convention exclusive boxset, "Dreadnok Rampage: Escapades in the Everglades", but that name didn't sport any trademark claim after it.

Divebomb. Following the release of the original Predacon toy in 1986, the only two new "Divebomb" toys released by Hasbro thus far were an Energon Terrorcon from 2004 and a "Classics" Mini-Con, available as part of the Night Rescue Team in 2006.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Divebomb" prior to the release of the Energon toy from 2004, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Divebomb" in 2005, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the "Classics" Mini-Con from 2006.

Trypticon. Following the release of the original toy in 1986, the only new "Trypticon" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a "Classics" redeco of the Legends of Cybertron Scourge toy that was available in 2006. Hasbro trademarked the name "Trypticon" prior to the release of the "Classics" Legends toy, which was also the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Swerve. Following the release of the original Autobot Mini-Vehicle toy in 1986 came a large gap in the release of new "Swerve" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being a Universe redeco of the Armada Super-Con Blurr toy from 2004, followed by a redeco of Alternators Autobot Tracks and a redeco of the Cybertron Scout Class Clocker toy, both of them released in 2005.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Swerve" prior to the release of the Universe Deluxe toy from 2004, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Swerve" in 2005, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.
Of the three "Swerve" toys released by Hasbro after 1986, all three transformed into red sports cars rather than a pickup truck. Still, the Alternators toy actually sported a head sculpt directly based on the original 1986 toy.

Runamuck. Following the release of the original Battlecharger toy in 1986, the only new "Runamuck" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Side Swipe toy, available as part of the Cybertron line in 2005, sporting a new head sculpt that was based on the original 1986 Runabout and Runamuck toys, but the black color scheme of Runabout (in addition, Takara's "Galaxy Force" version of the toy was actually called "Runabout" in Japan), hence making it a substitute name for "Runabout", which is apparently currently not available to Hasbro.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Runamuck" prior to the release of the Cybertron toy, which was also the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Fortress Maximus. Following the release of the original Headmaster toy in 1987, the only new "Fortress Maximus" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a Heroes of Cybertron PVC, assembled from parts that were included with the six toys from wave 4 of the Heroes of Cybertron line (Autobot Espionage Team, Wheeljack, Autobot Jazz, Dirge, Powermaster Gigatron and Perceptor), with the name being featured as "Fortress Maximus™" on the packaging for all six individual toys. Hasbro attempted to register the name "Fortress Maximus" in 2001, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2003. Hasbro attempted to register the name for a second time in 2003, but ultimately abandoned that attempt in 2005 once again.

Scorponok. Following the release of the original Headmaster toy in 1987 came a large gap in the release of new "Scorponok" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Beast Wars Mega Beast toy from 1996. After that came a McDonald's Happy Meal "Transmetal" toy that was available in 1998 (with the name featured as "Scorponok™" on the pack-in leaflet), the Energon Command Class toy from 2003, a "Built to Rule" representation of the Energon toy that was only availabe on test markets in 2004, a 3" Titanium figure and two different toys from the live Action Transformers movie toyline, a Deluxe Class toy and a miniature figure that was available with the Voyager Class Blackout toy (with Deluxe Class Scorponok and Voyager Class Blackout later also being available as a Toys'R'Us exclusive "Decepticon Desert Attack" two-pack). In addition, there was also a Burger King Kid's Meal toy available in 2007, with the name being featured as "Scorponok®" in all the official advertising.
Hasbro originally registered the name "Scorponok" in 1987, following the release of the original Headmaster toy, but since they wouldn't release a new toy for many years, the registration was ultimately abandoned in 1994. During the "Beast Wars" era, Hasbro apparently didn't intend to use the name more frequently to justify a registration, hence the Beast Wars Mega toy from 1996 and the McDonald's Happy Meal toy from 1998 both simply sported a ™ after the name. Hasbro eventually attempted to register the name for a second time in 2004, coinciding with the release of the Energon Command Class toy, but ultimately abandoned that attempt in 2005. Immediately following that, Hasbro started a third registration attempt and thus finally successfully registered the name "Scorponok" in 2006, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the 3" Titanium figure fom 2006.
The only compound trademark that included the name "Scorponok" thus far was "Dark Scorponok", a redeco of the Energon Command Class toy that was available as part of the Cybertron line.

Weirdwolf. Following the release of the original Headmaster toy in 1987, the only new "Weirdwolf" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a "Timelines" redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe Class Snarl toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007. Oddly enough, the toy's tech spec card features the name as "Weirdwolf®", even though Hasbro apparently haven't attempted to register the name thus far (which would actually make the ® claim illegal).

Sixshot. While Hasbro never used the exact name again following the release of the original Six Changer toy in 1987, there was an Energon Mega Class toy released in 2005 that used a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Six Shot" (a redeco of the Energon Mega Class Shockblast toy), referred to as "Six Shot™" on the packaging. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name "Six Shot".

Rollbar. Following the release of the original Throttlebot toy in 1987 came a large gap in the release of new "Rollbar" toys, although there was a "Classic Throttlebots" reissue of the original 1987 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
The first new "Rollbar" toy to be released by Hasbro in the USA in a long time was the Robots in Disguise Basic toy from 2001, a redeco of the 1986 Combaticon Swindle toy that could form a limb of the Robots in Disguise Ruination combiner. After that came an Armada Mini-Con that was included with the Armada Max-Con Scavenger toy from 2002, two different redecos of the Robots in Disguise Rollbar toy that were available as part of two different Wal*Mart exclusive Ruination giftsets (one of them released as part of the Robots in Disguise line, the other one as part of the Universe line), a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con that was available with the Energon Mega Class Treadbolt toy (a redeco of Armada Scavenger) and a redeco of the Alternators Swindle toy.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Rollbar" prior to the release of the Robots in Disguise toy, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Rollbar" in 2002, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Mini-Con available with Energon Treadbolt in 2003, as the redeco of the RiD toy available with the first Wal*Mart exclusive Ruination giftset had still featured the name as "Rollbar™".

Wideload. Following the release of the original Throttlebot toy in 1987 came a large gap in the release of new "Wideload" toys, although there was a "Classic Throttlebots" reissue of the original 1987 toy which was exclusively available in Europe in 1991, but since the toy was not released in the USA, it had no implications on the US trademark.
The only two new "Wideload" toys to be released by Hasbro in the USA thus far were an Energon Powerlinx Combiner from 2005 that was part of the Constructicon Maximus team (later also sold in "Universe" packaging in 2006, this time exclusively available at Dollar General stores) and a "Classics" Mini-Con that was available as part of the Demolition Team in 2006.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Wideload" prior to the release of the Energon from 2005, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro attempted to register "Wideload" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005.

Slugslinger. Following the release of the original Targetmaster toy in 1987, the only new "Slugslinger" toy released by Hasbro thus far was the Energon Combat Class toy from 2004. Hasbro trademarked the name "Slugslinger" prior to the release of the Energon toy, which was also the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro sucessfully registered "Slugslinger" in 2005, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Nightstick. Following the release of the original toy in 1987 (the Nebulan companion of the Targetmaster version of Cyclonus) came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Nightstick", although there was a figure from Hasbro's "C.O.P.S." line using the name which was available in 1989. The first and only new Transformers toy to use the name "Nightstick" thus far was a reissue of the original 1987 Nebulan figure, which was available with the Commemorative Series IX Ricochet "reissue" from 2004 (with Ricochet himself being a reissue of Stepper, a "Targetmaster" redeco of the original 1984 Jazz toy that was originally only available in Japan in 1987, also including the Nebulan figure). Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Nightstick" prior to the release of the C.O.P.S. toy from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro attempted to register "Nightstick" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2006.

Repugnus. Following the release of the original Monsterbot toy in 1987, the only two new "Repugnus" toys released by Hasbro thus far were a Universe redeco of the Beast Wars Basic Beast Buzzclaw toy (exclusively available from Target stores in 2006, as part of a two-pack with Overbite) and a redeco of the Cybertron Scout Class Undermine toy that was also available in 2006. Hasbro trademarked the toy prior to the intended release of the Universe two-pack (which was originally supposed to come out in late 2004/early 2005, but was delayed and ultimately ended up as a Target exclusive), which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro sucessfully registered "Repugnus" in 2006, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Landmine. Following the release of the original Pretender toy in 1988 came a large gap in the release of new "Landmine" toys, with the only two new toys using that name released by Hasbro thus far being the Energon Command Class toy from 2004 and the Cybertron Deluxe Class toy from 2005 (which was later also available as a Wal*Mart exclusive repackage with a "Tiny Tins" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Dirt Boss and as a part of a Toys'R'Us exclusive "Super Value" three-pack with the Cybertron Deluxe Class toys Snarl and Dirt Boss). Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Landmine" prior to the release of the original Pretender toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro sucessfully registered "Landmine" in 2005, but since the Toys'R'Us exclusive "Super Value" three-pack from 2006 reused the packaging inserts from the original mass retail Cybertron Deluxe toys, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Overbite. Following the release of the original Seacon toy in 1988, the only new "Overbite" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a Universe redeco of the Beast Wars II Hellscream toy (which in turn was a redeco of the Beast Wars Cybershark toy that was previously only available in Japan) which was exclusively available from Target stores in 2006, as part of a two-pack with Repugnus. A redeco of the original 1988 Seacon toy that would have been available as part of a Wal*Mart exclusive "Piranhaking" giftset (a redeco of the 1988 Piranacon combiner) in 2004/2005 was also planned, but was ultimately never released. Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Overbite" prior to the release of the original Seacon toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name (both on the individual toy's packaging and the Piranacon giftset's packaging). Hasbro attempted to register "Overbite" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005.

Dreadwind. Following the release of the original Powermaster toy in 1988, the only two new "Dreadwind" toys released by Hasbro thus far were a Robots in Disguise redeco of the Generation 2 Dreadwing toy from 2003 (available as a Target exclusive two-pack with Smokejumper) and a "Timelines" redeco of the Classic Voyager Jetfire toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2007. Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Dreadwind" prior to the release of the original Powermaster toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Oddly enough, the the BotCon 2007 exclusive "Games of Decepticon" boxset's packaging and the Dreadwind toy's tech spec card both feature the name as "Dreadwind®", even though Hasbro apparently haven't attempted to register the name thus far (which would actually make the ® claim illegal).

Dreadwing. Following the release of the original toy in 1988 (the combined form of the individual Powermaster Dreadwind and Darkwing toys) came a large gap in the release of new "Dreadwing" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Generation 2 toy from 1994. After that came yet another large gap.
Hasbro would eventually start to use the name "Dreadwing" more frequently again in 2004, starting with a redeco of the Energon Mega Class Mirage toy, followed by a "Classics" Mini-Con that was available as part of the Predator Attack Team in 2007 and a Deluxe Class toy from the live action Transformers Movie toyline.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Dreadwing" prior to the release of the Generation 2 toy from 1994, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Dreadwing" in 2005, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the "Classics" Mini-Con from 2007.

Nightbeat. Following the release of the original Headmaster toy in 1988, the only two new "Nightbeat" toys released by Hasbro thus far were an Armada Mini-Con that was available with the Armada Super-Con Side Swipe toy from 2003 and a Universe redeco of the Mini-Con that was available in 2004 as part of a "Battle in a Box" two-pack featuring Ultra Magnus and Treadshot (redecos of the Armada Super-Con Optimus Prime and Side Swipe toys, respectively). Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Nightbeat" prior to the release of the original Headmaster toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Nightbeat" in 2004, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the Universe Mini-Con from 2004.
A modified version of the name as a compound term, "Night Beat 7", was used once on a Real Gear Robots toy from the live action Transformers Movie toyline (a redeco of the Real Gear Robot Booster X10) that was available in 2007.

Landfill. Following the release of the original Targetmaster toy in 1988, the only two new "Landfill" toys released by Hasbro thus far were the combined form of the Robots in Disguise Construction Team from 2001 (referred to as "Landfill™" on the back of the packaging for each of the four individual Construction Team members Grimlock, Wedge, Hightower and Heavy Load) and a redeco of the RiD combiner that was available as a Wal*Mart exclusive giftset in 2003. Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Landfill" prior to the release of the original Targetmaster toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Quickmix. Following the release of the original Targetmaster toy in 1988, the only two new "Quickmix" toys released by Hasbro thus far were a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Constructicon from 2004 (used as a substitute name for "Mixmaster", which is currently not available to Hasbro) and the Cybertron Voyager Class toy from 2006. Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Quickmix" prior to the release of the original Targetmaster toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Ricochet. Following the release of the original toy in 1988 (one of the two Nebulan companions of the Targetmaster Quickmix toy), the only three new "Ricochet" toys released by Hasbro thus far were a Commemorative Series IX "reissue" of the Targetmaster Stepper toy (a redeco of the original 1984 Jazz toy that was originally only available in Japan in 1987) from 2004 (thereby establishing "Ricochet" as Hasbro's official Western name for Takara's Stepper toy), a "Timelines" redeco of the Generation 2 Cyberjet Hooligan toy that was exclusively available at BotCon 2005 and a redeco of the Alternators Silverstreak toy that was available in 2006. Hasbro trademarked the name "Ricochet" prior to the release of the Commemorative Series toy from 2004, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Ricochet" in 2005, but since the Alternators toy from 2006 had still featured the name as "Ricochet™", there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Override. Following the release of the original Triggerbot toy in 1988, the only new "Override" toy released by Hasbro thus far was the Cybertron Deluxe Class toy from 2005 (which was later also available as a Wal*Mart exclusive repackage with a "Tiny Tins" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Dirt Boss and as a Target exclusive two-pack with Cybertron Hot Shot, called the "Drag Race Pack!"). In addition, the Energon Command Class Ultra Magnus toy from 2003 was originally supposed to come with redecos of the Armada Street Speed Mini-Con Team named "Clocker", "Brakedown" and "Override" (with Override being a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Backtrack), but even though the names were featured on the toy's packaging (at least in the USA), the actual toy was ultimately available with redecos of the Armada Space Mini-Con Team instead. Therefore, it's hard to tell if this counts as a "use" of the name or not.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Override" prior to the release of the original Triggerbot toy from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Override" in 2005, but since the Wal*Mart exclusive repackage with the Tiny Tin Dirt Boss Mini-Con from 2006 had still featured the name as "Override™", and the Target exclusive "Drag Race Pack!" had reused the packaging inserts from the original mass retail Cybertron Deluxe toys, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.
The only compound trademark of sorts thus far that included the name "Override", namely "Override GTS", was used once on a redeco of the Cybertron Deluxe Class toy.

Bludgeon. Following the release of the original Pretender toy in 1989, the only new "Bludgeon" toy released by Hasbro thus far was the KB Toys exclusive RiD "Destructicon" toy from 2003 (a redeco of the Generation 2 Hero Megatron toy). Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Bludgeon" prior to the release of the original Pretender toy from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.
The KB Toys exclusive RiD "Destructicon" toy was referred to on the packaging and in the instructions as "Destructicon™ Bludgeon™", hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term.

Thunderwing. Following the release of the original Mega Pretender toy in 1989 came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Thunderwing". Instead, Hasbro released a redeco of the G.I. Joe Thunder figure from 1984 that was available with the MOBAT (Motorized Offensive Battle Attack Tank) vehicle in 1998. The first time Hasbro actually used the name on a Transformers toy again was an Armada Mini-Con (originally available as part of the Air Military Mini-Con Team) that was available in various decos as part of the Armada and Universe lines in 2003 and 2004, followed by a "Classics" Mini-Con that was available as part of the Clear Skies Team in 2007.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Thunderwing" prior to the release of the original Mega Pretender toy from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro registered "Thunderwing" in 1997, to be used for "toy action figures and toy vehicles", but ultimately, the first and only toy to sport an ® after the name would be the G.I. Joe figure from 1998. Oddly enough, both the Armada Mini-Con and its Universe redeco are referred to as "Thunderwing™" on the packaging again. Hasbro then tried to register the name for a second time in 2002, thise time with a broader definition of possible uses, namely "toy action figures, toy vehicles and toy robots convertible into other visual forms", but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005, whereas the original registration had already been abandoned in 2004.

Roadblock. Following the release of the original Ultra Pretender toy in 1989 came a large gap in the release of new "Roadblock" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Generation 2 Auto Roller toy from 1995. The only other Transformers toy to use the name "Roadblock" released by Hasbro since then was an Energon Combat Class toy from 2005 (a redeco of the Combat Class Inferno toy). However, Hasbro have used the name far more frequently as part of the G.I. Joe line, originally on a figure from 1984 (thereby preceding the Transformers toy), with the largest gap between G.I. Joe toys using the name "Roadblock" being between 1994 and 2002 (with the Generation 2 Auto Roller making it a gap in the overall use of the name "Roablock" by Hasbro between 1995 and 2002). The last G.I. Joe figure to use the name thus far was available as part of the G.I. Joe Battle Pack #1 in 2007. In addition, there was also a figure from Hasbro's "C.O.P.S." line using the name which was available with the Highway Interceptor vehicle in 1989, concurrently with the release of the Pretender toy.
Hasbro trademarked the name "Roadblock" prior to the release of the third G.I. Joe figure of that name (commonly known as "Tiger Force Roadblock") from 1988, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name (followed by the Transformers Pretender toy a year later). Hasbro finally sucessfully registered "Roadblock" in 2007, but since no new toys sporting that name have been released thus far, there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Roadhandler. Following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1989 (available as part of the Race Car Patrol), the only new "Roadhandler" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Incinerator that was available with the Universe Deluxe Swerve toy from 2004 (a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Blurr toy, referred to on the packaging as "Swerve™ with Roadhandler™"). Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Roadhandler" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Thus far, Hasbro have not attempted to register the name.

Overload. Following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1989 came a large gap in the release of new "Overload" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being the Armada Max-Con toy from 2003, followed by a redeco of the Armada toy that was available as a Costco exclusive Energon two-pack with a redeco of the Armada Super-Base Optimus Prime toy in 2004 and a KB Toys exclusive Universe Micromaster Railbot from 2005. Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Overload" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Overload" in 2004, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name being the Energon redeco of the Armada toy from the Costco exclusive two-pack with Optimus Prime.

Storm Cloud. While Hasbro never used the exact name again following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1989 (available as part of the Air Strike Patrol), there were an Armada Mini-Con from 2003 (available as part of the Sea Mini-Con Team), a redeco of the Mini-Con and an Energon Powerlinx Combiner from 2005 that was part of the Bruticus Maximus team, all of which used a slightly modified version of the name as a single word, "Stormcloud". Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Storm Cloud" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1989, which was therefore the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro trademarked the modified name "Stormcloud" prior to the release of the first version of the Armada Mini-Con from 2003, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro successfully registered "Stormcloud" in 2004, with the first and only toy thus far to sport an ® after the name being the Energon toy from 2005.

Sledge. Following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1990 (available as part of the Constructor Squad), the only two new "Sledge" toys released by Hasbro thus far were an Energon Powerlinx Combiner from 2004 that was part of the Constructicon Maximus team and a "Classics" Mini-Con that was available as part of the Demolition Team in 2006. Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Sledge" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1990, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro attempted to register "Sledge" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005.
In addition, Hasbro used a compound name that included the term "Sledge", namely "Sledge Trooper", for a Biomecha kit from their short-lived Xevoz line that was released in 2004, which was the first and only toy to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro attempted to register "Sledge Trooper" in 2004, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005 as well.

Knockout. While Hasbro never used the exact name again following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1990 (available as part of the Constructor Squad), there were an Armada Mini-Con from 2002 (available as part of the Land Military Mini-Con Team) and a redeco of the Armada Mini-Con Rollout that was available with the Energon Command Class Ultra Magnus toy from 2003 (a redeco of the Armada Max-Con Overload toy), both of which used a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Knock Out".
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Knockout" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1990, which was therefore the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro trademarked the modified name "Knock Out" prior to the release of the Armada Mini-Con from 2002, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro successfully registered "Knock Out" in 2003, but since but since the Mini-Con companion of the Energon Ultra Magnus toy from late 2003 had still featured the name as "Knock Out™", there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Tread Bolt. While Hasbro never used the exact name again following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1990 (available as part of the Air Patrol), there was an Energon Mega Class toy from 2003 which used a slightly modified version of the name as a single word, "Treadbolt". Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Tread Bolt" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1990, which was therefore the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro trademarked the modified name "Treadbolt" prior to the release of the Energon toy from 2003, which was the first and only toy thus far to sport a ™ after that name. Hasbro attempted to register "Treadbolt" in 2003, but ultimately abandoned the attempt in 2005.

Blackout. Following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1990 (available with the Decepticon Anti-Aircraft Base) came a large gap in the release of new "Blackout" toys, with the first new toy using that name in a long time being an Armada Mini-Con that was available with the Armada Super-Con Demolishor toy from 2002, followed by a "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con (available with Powerlinx Demolishor), another redeco of the Armada Mini-Con (available with a KB Toys exclusive redeco of Demolishor released in 2004 as part of the Energon line), an Energon Powerlinx Combiner from 2005 that was part of the Bruticus Maximus team and and various toys released as part of the live action Transformers Movie toyline, namely a Voyager Class toy (which was later also available as a Toys'R'Us exclusive "Decepticon Desert Attack" two-pack with the Deluxe Class Scorponok toy), a Legends Class toy, a Fast Action Battler, a Robot Heroes figure (abailable as a two-pack with Optimus Prime), a 3" Titanium figure and a Burger King Kid's Meal toy. In addition, Hasbro also released a G.I. Joe figure that used a slightly modified version of the name as a compound term, "Black Out", which was available as part of a "Spy Troops" two-pack with Flint from the "G.I. Joe vs. Cobra" line in 2003.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Blackout" prior to the release of the original Micromaster toy from 1990, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Blackout" in 2003, with the first toy to sport an ® after the name on the packaging being the Mini-Con that came with the KB Toys exclusive redeco of the Armada Demolishor toy from 2004, although the instructions for the Mini-Con that came with the Armada "Powerlinx" redeco of Demolishor already referred to the toy as "Blackout®" (the packaging, however, still featured the name as "Blackout™").
The "Powerlinx" redeco of the Armada Mini-Con was referred to as "Powerlinx™ Blackout™" on the packaging and as "Powerlinx™ Blackout®" in the instructions, hence making it a sequence of two separate trademarks rather than a compound term. Likewise, the "Gyro Blade Blackout" Fast Action Battler from the live action Transformers Movie toyline features the words "Gyro Blade" in a different font size and color than the trademark "Blackout®", using it as a purely descriptive term, with no trademark claim whatsoever.

Barricade. Following the release of the original Micromaster toy in 1990 (available with the Race Track Patrol) came a large gap in the release of new Transformers toys using the name "Barricade". Instead, Hasbro released a G.I. Joe figure named "Barricade" that was available in 1992, with a "Battle Corps" redeco following in 1993 and another redeco released as part of the Anti-Venom Task Force Front six-pack from the "Valor vs. Venom" line in 2004. In addition, there was also a figure from Hasbro's "C.O.P.S." line using the name which was available in 1989, prior tot the release of the Micromaster.
The first time Hasbro actually used the name on a Transformers toy again was the Energon Combat Class toy from 2005 (a Powerlinx Combiner that was part of the Bruticus Maximus team, later also sold in "Universe" packaging, this time exclusively available at Big Lots and Tuesday Morning stores), followed by various toys released as part of the live action Transformers Movie toyline, namely a Deluxe Class toy (which was later also available as a Wal*Mart exclusive "First Encounter" two-pack with the first Deluxe Class Bumblebee toy), a Legends Class toy (which was later also availabe as part of a Toys'R'Us exclusive Legends six-pack with Bumblebee, Autobot Jazz, Optimus Prime, Megatron and Starscream), a Fast Action Battler, a Cyber Slammer, a Robot Heroes figure (available as a two-pack with Bumblebee) and a Robot Replica figure.
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Barricade" prior to the release of the C.O.P.S. toy from 1989, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Barricade" in 2005, with the first toys to sport an ® after the name being the Deluxe and Legends Class and Cyber Slammer toys from the live action Transformers Movie line released in 2007.
The only compound trademark that included the name "Barricade" thus far was "Recon Barricade", a redeco of the live action Transformers Movie Deluxe Class toy (referred to on the packaging as "Recon Barricade™"). Meanwhile, the "Blade Shield Barricade" Fast Action Battler from the live action Transformers Movie toyline featured no trademark claim whatsoever at all after the name, oddly enough.

Treadshot. Following the release of the original Action Master toy in 1990, the only two new "Treadshot" toys released by Hasbro thus far were a Universe redeco of the Armada Super-Con Side Swipe toy from 2004 (available as part of a "Battle in a Box" two-pack with Ultra Magnus, a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Optimus Prime toy) and an Energon Powerlinx Combiner from 2004 that was part of the Superion Maximus team (later also sold in "Universe" packaging in 2006, this time exclusively available at Dollar General stores).
Hasbro originally trademarked the name "Treadshot" prior to the release of the original Action Master toy from 1990, which was the first toy to sport a ™ after the name. Hasbro successfully registered "Treadshot" in 2005, but since the Dollar General exclusive "Universe" re-release of the Energon toy had still featured the name as "Treadshot™", there has been no toy that sported an ® after the name yet.

Skyfall. Following the release of the original Action Master toy in 1990, the only new "Skyfall" toy released by Hasbro thus far was a "Timelines" redeco of the Energon Powerlinx Combiner Terradive toy that was exclusively available for members of the Official Transformers Collectors' Club, although the bio card didn't any trademark claim whatsoever at all after the name, whereas the instructions were recycled from the Energon Terradive toy, hence simply featuring that name instead. Thus, it's hard to say whether this counts as a "use" of the trademark at all.

Introduction: Name reuses within the various Transformers toylines
Index by years
Alphabetical index
Part 1: Overview - copyrights, patents and trademarks
Part 2: Names Hasbro never lost (1)
Part 3: Names Hasbro never lost (2)
Part 5: Names Hasbro managed to get back (2)
Part 6: Names Hasbro had to modify
Part 7: Names Hasbro had to find a substitute for
Part 8: Names of characters which were originally not released as toys


 
 
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